Event Archive

Overview

Past Events

Event 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

Impacts of Teacher-Student Race Match on Student High School Outcomes
Cassandra Hart, Associate Professor of Education, UC Davis

Cassandra Hart is an associate professor of education policy. She evaluates the effects of school, state and national education programs, policies, and practices on overall student achievement, and on the equality of student outcomes. Hart’s work has focused on school choice programs, school accountability policies, and effects on students of exposure to demographically similar teachers. She is also interested in the effects of virtual schooling on student outcomes, both in K-12 and post-secondary settings.

William T. Grant Foundation Presentation
Adam Gamoran, President, William T. Grant Foundation

The William T. Grant Foundation supports research to improve the lives of young people.  Within this broad mission it has to areas of focus: research on reducing inequality in youth outcomes, and research on improving the use of research evidence in policy and practice.  Adam Gamoran, president of the Foundation, will discuss the Foundation’s priorities and the opportunities it provides for research funding.

Event Reducing Youth Inequality in an Era of Alternative Facts William T. Grant Foundation Presentation International House Community Room

UC Davis Forums: Can Universities Serve the Public Good? Using Rigorous Research for Social Impact
Adam Gamoran, President, William T. Grant Foundation

In his remarks, President Gamoran will argue that universities should do more to support research that benefits society by responding to the pressing problems of the day. He will lay out a strategy for institutions to incentivize this type of work by supporting partnerships between researchers and public agencies or private nonprofit organizations.

The lecture will take place from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m. in the Community Room of the International House (across the street from the main UC Davis campus). A reception and light refreshments will follow in the Lounge.

Reducing Youth Inequality in an Era of Alternative Facts
Adam Gamoran, President, William T. Grant Foundation

Income inequality in the U.S. is near an all-time high, with damaging consequences for the future of our nation.  The William T. Grant Foundation is committed to supporting research on ways to reduce inequality among young people.  In an era when evidence is ignored and even fundamental facts are challenged, what role can researchers play in advancing sound policies?  Adam Gamoran will explain the Foundation’s focus on reducing inequality and improving the use of evidence in policy decisions, and will consider how one might think about these priorities in light of contemporary battles over facts and evidence.  He will derive key areas for research on reducing inequality from recent consensus reports on effective strategies, and encourage research that responds to these challenges.

Event Student Community Center, Multi-Purpose Room

Levine Family Fund Lecture- Life, Death, and Mental Health: How Access to Care Helps Children Succeed
Janet Currie, Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Princeton University
Hosted by the Department of Economics

Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for Health and Wellbeing. She also co-directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She has served as the Vice President of the American Economics Association and is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Academy of Art and Sciences.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Childhood Family Structure, Education, and Intergenerational Income Mobility
Ryan Finnigan, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC Davis

Despite evidence that children from low-income families without two parents are doubly disadvantaged, a growing body of research on the interactive role of childhood family structure for intergenerational mobility finds the opposite—differences in adult attainment by childhood family structure are greatest among those with the most advantaged parents. This study examines: (1) how children’s educational attainment varies by childhood family structure and parental income; and (2) how much these education differences account for lifelong income disparities by childhood family structure.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Adversity and the Development of Regulation
Leah Hibel, Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, UC Davis

Abstract: One powerful capacity that enables people to successfully cope with stress is their ability to regulate their emotions, thoughts, and behaviors (i.e., self-regulation). Young children learn self-regulation, in large part, through daily parent-child interactions which stimulates the development of long term regulatory functioning. However, contextual stressors can spill over to disrupt parent-child relationships and this disruption is thought to be a primary mechanism by which early stress initiates poorer mental and physical health outcomes.

Event Student Community Center, Multi-Purpose Room

Geographies of Poverty Conference
The Importance of Neighborhoods, Segregation, and Mobility in Perpetuating Disadvantage

Advanced registration for this conference is closed. Registration will be offered at the conference pending space availability. 

Participants include:

Decoupling Schools and Neighborhoods: Safety, School Location, Social Ties, and Neighborhood Perception
Julia Burdick-Will, Johns Hopkins University

The Ethnic Segregation of Immigrants in the United States, 1850-1940
Katherine Eriksson, UC Davis

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Do Income Shocks Affect Domestic Violence?
Analisa Packham, Assistant Professor of Economics, Miami University

Analisa Packham is an Assistant Professor of Economics in the Farmer School of Business at Miami University. 

Professor Packham studies applied microeconomics, including labor and health economics and the economics of education. Her research focuses primarily on evaluating the effects of food stamp timing as well as contraception and family planning policies. 

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

The Effects of DNA Databases on the Deterrence and Detection of Offenders
Jennifer Doleac, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Texas A&M

Jennifer Doleac is an Associate Professor of Economics at Texas A&M University, and Director of the Justice Tech Lab. Professor Doleac is also a Nonresident Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, a research affiliate at the University of Chicago Crime Lab and the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities, and a research fellow at IZA. Her research focuses on the economics of crime and discrimination, with particular emphases on prisoner reentry and the effects of technology on public safety.

Event 273 SS&H

Barriers to Infant Immunization Among the Poor
Jessamyn Schaller, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Arizona

Professor Schaller studies a variety of topics in labor, public, and health economics, with an emphasis on the associations between aggregate and individual labor market shocks, health, and child outcomes.

Event Ann Huff Stevens 273 SS&H

Dynamics and Persistence of the Earned Income Tax Credit
Ann Stevens, Professor of Economics

Ann Stevens image

Ann Huff Stevens is Deputy Director of the Center for Poverty Research and Professor of Economics at UC Davis. She studies low income workers and labor markets, the incidence and effects of job loss, connections between economic shocks and health, and poverty and safety-net dynamics.

Her current work examines returns to vocational education programs, the dynamics of EITC eligibility, and long-term effects of labor force non-participation. 

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Scarcity in the Land of Plenty: Healthcare in California’s San Joaquin Valley
Michelle Ko, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences

Michelle Ko is a faculty affiliate and member of the Center for Poverty Research Executive Committee. Dr. Ko looks at how policy, healthcare, and our social structure are interconnected,  and their impacts on disadvantaged communities. She has conducted research on a variety of topics, including the healthcare safety net, Medicaid, long-term care, access to healthcare for minority populations, diversity in medical education, and the healthcare workforce.

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Lower Ed: Credentials and Inequality
Tressie McMillan Cottom, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Virginia Commonwealth University

Tressie McMillan Cottom is an assistant professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University and faculty associate with Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.

Her research on higher education, work and technological change in the new economy has been supported by the Microsoft Research Network’s Social Media Collective, The Kresge Foundation, the American Educational Research Association and the UC Davis Center for Poverty Research.  She has published on race/class/gender, education, and technology in the new economy.

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Inequality and Children’s Brain Development
Kimberly Noble, Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Education, Columbia University

Kimberly Noble is a developmental cognitive neuroscientist and pediatrician who studies socioeconomic disparities in children’s neurocognitive development. She received her undergraduate, graduate, and medical degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and trained at the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College. She completed her pediatrics residency at Columbia University Medical Center/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York Presbyterian.

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Racial Differences in Students’ Educational Returns to Parental Income
Jordan Conwell, Post-Doctoral Fellow, Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jordan Conwell is an Anna Julia-Cooper Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2018-2019, he will begin an appointment there as an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Education Policy Studies. His research agenda encompasses many aspects of racial inequality in education, spanning early childhood, K-12, and higher ed. Dr.

Event Sign-up for e-News View Past Events UC Center Sacramento | 1130 K St LL22, Sacramento, CA 958149:00am to 1:00pm

The Impoverishing Effects of Federal Immigration Policy in California: Psychological, Social, and Economic
February 8, 2018

Conference Poster

The Trump administration has proposed several changes that will affect federal immigration policies and their enforcement  such as the repeal of DACA, a decrease in the number of  H1B visas and  more aggressive deportations of undocumented.

Event GSM Executive Boardroom, 3102 Gallagher Hall

8th Annual UC Davis Finance Symposium: Capital / Labor Markets in the Age of Inequality
Hosted by the UC Davis Graduate School of Management

The Graduate School of Management and The Center for Poverty Research are proud to co-host the Eighth Annual UC Davis Finance Symposium:  “Capital / Labor Markets in the Age of Inequality”.  In this one-day symposium, we will discuss six macro/labor/finance papers that examine determinants of inequality in labor markets and its consequence in the capital markets and the aggregate economy. All are invited but RSVP is required for attendance due to limited seating.

Event Center for Health and the Environment

Migrant Farmworker Health, Inequality, and What Can Be Done?
Seth Holmes, Associate Professor of Public Health and Medical Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Co-hosted by the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety and the Center for Poverty Research

Seth Holmes, Phd, MD, Associate Professor of Public Health and Medical Anthropology at UC Berkeley will give a talk on Migrant Farmworker Health, Inequality, and What Can Be Done.

Dr. Holmes is a cultural and medical anthropologist and physician at UC Berkeley whose work focuses broadly on social hierarchies, health inequalities, and the ways in which perceptions of social difference may naturalize, normalize, or challenge these inequalities.

Event Click Here to Register for the Conference Student Community Center, Multi-Purpose Room

Fall Conference: Unintended Effects of the Safety Net
November 17, 2017

This conference will bring together researchers and policy experts to discuss new evidence on the role of means-tested programs, including SNAP, WIC and Medicaid  in the United States. Register now.

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Unstable and Unpredictable Work Schedules in Retail: Company Practices, Worker Wellbeing, and Policy Response
Daniel Schneider, Assistant Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley

Daniel Schneider completed his B.A. in Public Policy at Brown University in 2003 and earned his PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University in 2012.  Before joining the Department of Sociology, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Postdoctoral Scholar in Health Policy Research at UC Berkeley.

Event 2203 SS&H, Andrews Conference Room

Male Earnings, Marriageable Men, and Non-Marital Fertility: Evidence from the Fracking Boom
Melissa Kearney, Professor of Economics, University of Maryland

Melissa S. Kearney is a Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland. She is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); a non-resident Senior Fellow at Brookings; a scholar affiliate and member of the board of the Notre Dame Wilson-Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO); and a scholar affiliate of the MIT Abdul Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and co-chair of the J-PAL cities and states initiative.

Event UC Davis Alumni Center, AGR Room

Sheffrin Lecture in Public Policy: Will Evidence-Based Policy Improve Social Programs?
Ron Haskins, Brookings Institution

Ron Haskins is a Senior Fellow and holds the Cabot Family Chair in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he co-directs the Center on Children and Families. He is also a senior consultant at the Annie E. Casey Foundation and was the President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management in 2016. Haskins is the co-author of Show Me the Evidence: Obama’s Fight for Rigor and Evidence in Social Policy (2015) and the author of Work over Welfare: The Inside Story of the 1996 Welfare Reform Law (2006).

Event Breaking the Cycle? The Intergenerational Effects of Head Start 273 SS&H Conference Room

The Effect of Childhood Food Stamp Access on Criminal Behavior
Andrew Barr, Texas A&M

Andrew Barr is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Texas A&M University who focuses on understanding the effects of education policies on disadvantaged and non-traditional student populations.  Much of his research focuses on understanding the role of financial and informational factors in the college enrollment decisions and related labor market outcomes of military veterans and displaced workers. More recent work focuses on the effects of early childhood interventions.  Barr holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Virginia.

Event College and Intergenerational Mobility: New Evidence from Administrative Data 1131 SS&H, Economics Gold Conference Room

Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility
Danny Yagan, UC Berkeley

Danny Yagan is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of California Berkeley and a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He earned a BA summa cum laude and a PhD in economics from Harvard University and completed a post-doc at UC Berkeley. He works in public and labor economics focusing on education quality and access, capital taxes, and inequality in recovery from the great recession.

Event Vanderhoef Studio Theater, Mondavi Center, UC Davis

Mindsets: Implications for Achievement, Willpower, and Peace
Carol Dweck, Stanford University

Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D., is one of the world’s leading researchers in the field of motivation and is the Lewis and Virginia Eaton Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Her research has focused on why people succeed and how to foster success. She has held professorships at Columbia and Harvard Universities, has lectured all over the world, and has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Her scholarly book Self-Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development was named Book of the Year by the World Education Federation.

Event 273 SS&H Conference Room

Inequality on the Rise? Changes Over Time And Across Regions in Excess Mortality Among the Poor and Educationally Disadvantaged in Sweden
Anna Sjögren, Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy

Anna Sjögren earned her Ph.D. in economics at the Stockholm School of Economics in 1998. She works as a researcher at IFAU and is an UCLS affiliate. Her research focuses on education, human capital, family economics and the labor market. At present, she is involved in projects studying the effects of Swedish school reforms, and the importance of school and family policies for child health, and human capital development. Another project deals with long run changes in men’s and women’s opportunities to combine family and career.

Event Memorial Union, Garrison Room

The Impact of U.S. Food and Nutrition Programs on Child Well-being
Marianne Page, Deputy Director, Center for Poverty Research

The 2016-2017 Campus Community Book Project, featuring Raj Patel’s Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System, invites you to a lecture by Marianne Page, Professor, Department of Economics and Deputy Director, Center for Poverty Research, entitled “The Impact of U.S. Food and Nutrition Programs on Child Well-being.” This event is free and open to the public.

Event UC Center Sacramento1130 K Street, Room LL3, Sacramento, CA

UCCS Bacon Public Lectureship with Marianne Page, Center for Poverty Research
The Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty and the Long Reach of Child Health and Nutrition Programs

Join the UC Center Sacramento on Wednesday, March 1stat 12 noon for the UCCS Bacon Public Lectureship by Professor Marianne Page, Department of Economics, Deputy Director of the Center for Poverty Research, University of California, Davis and moderated by Daphne Hunt Chief Consultant to the California State Assembly Committee on Human Services. Professor Page will be speaking on “The Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty and the Long Reach of Child Health and Nutrition Programs”.

Event Click Here to Register for the Child Poverty Policy Summit UC Center Sacramento1130 K Street, Suite LL22 Sacramento, CA 95814

Child Poverty Research, Public Policy and the Road Ahead
What We Have Learned and Where Should We Go Next?

Child poverty continues to be a major challenge for the United States and California. The UC Davis Center for Poverty Research and UC Center Sacramento will bring together researchers, policymakers, and practitioners together for a workshop “Child Poverty Research, Public Policy and the Road Ahead: What We Have Learned and Where Should We Go Next?”  Sessions will focus on five key areas of research and policy: the importance of early childhood poverty and policies, education and poverty, the role of segregation, the impact of safety net programs, and unique challenges facing undocumented immigrant children.

Event Ethnic Philanthropy as a Non-Traditional Safety-Net: Do Elite Latinos Help to Alleviate Poverty in Latino Immigrant Communities? 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

Ethnic Philanthropy as a Non-Traditional Safety-Net: Do Elite Latinos Help to Alleviate Poverty in Latino Immigrant Communities?
Jody Vallejo, University of Southern California

Jody Vallejo, a small grants recipient, will be presenting his work as part of our seminar series.
Jody Agius Vallejo is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern California. She is an expert in immigration, race/ethnicity, Latinos and the Latino middle class. Her book, Barrios to Burbs: The Making of the Mexican American Middle Class (Stanford University Press) examines patterns of mobility and socioeconomic incorporation among upwardly mobile and middle-class Latinos in Southern California.

Event Memorial Union, MU II

Improving Equality of Opportunity in America: New Lessons from Big Data
Raj Chetty, Stanford University

Raj Chetty is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University. Chetty’s research combines empirical evidence and economic theory to help design more effective government policies. His work on tax policy, unemployment insurance, and education has been widely cited in media outlets and Congressional testimony. His current research focuses on equality of opportunity: how can we give children from disadvantaged backgrounds better chances of succeeding?

Event 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

Simplification, Assistance, and Incentives: A Randomized Experiment to Increase College Savings
Bridget Terry Long, Harvard University

Dr. Bridget Terry Long, Ph.D. is Academic Dean and the Saris Professor of Education and Economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  Long is an economist who specializes in the study of education, in particular the transition from high school to higher education and beyond.  Her work focuses on college student access and choice and the factors that influence students’ postsecondary and labor market outcomes. Current projects examine the roles of information and assistance in promoting college savings, the completion of aid applications, and college enrollment.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Homeless Programs and Social Insurance
Igor Popov

Igor Popov is an Economist at Airbnb, who recently received his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University. His research focuses on Public and Behavioral Economics, using theory and data to inform community decisions. In particular, his current projects explore homelessness, homesharing, and housing policy.

Poverty in 2015: Causes and Solutions
Twitter Chat @povertyresearch on 9/13 12 p.m. ET

On September 13th, the U.S. Census Bureau will release its annual report on income and poverty in the United States. The report documents how many Americans are poor and who they are. What it does not tell us is how we got here or how we can do better.

Join the conversation with leading experts on U.S. poverty and contribute to how we as a nation can increase opportunity for all.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Habit Formation and the Persistent Impact of WIC
David Frisvold, University of Iowa

David Frisvold, a small grants recipient, will be presenting his work as part of our seminar series.

David E. Frisvold is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Iowa.  Professor Frisvold’s research agenda explores the role for government policies to enhance education and health outcomes, with an emphasis on policies targeted towards low-income children. His research has focused on the School Breakfast, Head Start, SNAP, and now WIC programs.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Culture and the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital
David Figlio, Northwestern University

David Figlio is the Director of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University and Orrington Lunt Professor of Education and Social Policy and of Economics. Figlio conducts research on a wide range of education and health policy issues from school accountability and standards to welfare policy and policy design.

Figlio’s work has been published in numerous leading journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Law and Economics, and Journal of Human Resources.

Event 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

Education for All? Evidence from an Audit Study of Charter Schools
Peter Bergman, Columbia University

Peter Bergman is an Assistant Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. Bergman’s research uses randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to find low-cost, scalable interventions that improve education outcomes. 

Event Live Stream: UC Davis Poverty Research and Policy Summit Poverty Research and Policy in the US: Building a Path to Mobility 2016 UC Davis Poverty Research and Policy Summit UC Center Sacramento1130 K Street, Suite LL22 Sacramento, CA 95814

UC Davis Poverty Research and Policy Summit

Despite the slow emergence from the Great Recession in the U.S., inequality and poverty remain major dilemmas for the state and nation. The UC Davis Poverty Research and Policy Summit will bring together researchers, policymakers, practitioners and advocates to summarize and discuss the state of poverty research and public policy over the past decade, and how research can better inform policy in the decade to come.

Event 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

The Organizational Context of Employment Scarring
David Pedulla, The University of Texas at Austin

David Pedulla, a small grants recipient, will be presenting his work as part of our seminar series.

David Pedulla is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include race and gender stratification, labor markets, economic and organizational sociology, and experimental methods.

Event LIVE WEBCAST: Physical Health Consequences of Early Socioeconomic Hardship Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Physical Health Consequences of Early Socioeconomic Hardship: Mechanisms and Moderators
Edith Chen & Gregory Miller, Northwestern University

Edith Chen’s research seeks to understand why poverty is associated with poor physical health outcomes in children, with a focus on the psychological and biological mechanisms that explain these relationships. She is also interested in questions of resilience—that is, why some children who come from adversity manage to thrive and maintain good profiles of health.

Event 1113 SS&H, Economics Blue Conference Room

The Timing of SNAP Benefit Receipt and Children’s Academic Achievement
Anna Gassman-Pines, Duke University

Anna Gassman-Pines, a small grants recipient, will be presenting her work as part of our seminar series. Gassman-Pines is Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Psychology and Neuroscience at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. She is also Faculty Fellow of Duke’s Center for Child and Family Policy.

Event Ann Huff Stevens Garrison Room, Memorial Union, UC Davis

The Long Decline: U.S. Labor Market Inequality Before “Occupy”
Ann Huff Stevens, Director, Center for Poverty Research

Center Director Ann Stevens is presenting as part of the Campus Community Book Project series of events. The Campus Community Book Project (CCBP) was initiated to promote dialogue and build community by encouraging diverse members of the campus and surrounding communities to read the same book and attend related events. The book project advances the Office of Campus Community Relations (OCCR) mission to improve both the campus climate and community relations, to foster diversity and to promote equity and inclusiveness.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Unaffordable America: Poverty, Housing, Eviction
Matthew Desmond, Harvard University

Matthew Desmond is John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University and Co-Director of the Justice and Poverty Project. A former member of the Harvard Society of Fellows, he is the author of the award-winning book, On the Fireline, coauthor of two books on race, and editor of a collection of studies on severe deprivation in America. His work has been supported by the Ford, Russell Sage, and National Science Foundations, and his writing has appeared in the New York Times and Chicago Tribune.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

Does Welfare Inhibit Success? The Long-Term Effects of Removing Low-Income Youth from Disability Insurance
Manasi Deshpande, University of Chicago

Manasi Deshpande is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago.

Deshpande’s research interests include the effects of social insurance and public assistance programs on consumption, health, and well being, and the interaction between these programs and labor markets. Her dissertation work studied the long-term effects of welfare programs on the labor market outcomes of children in adulthood and on household labor supply and disability receipt. 

Employment, Earnings and Inequality: Realities and Opportunities in Low Wage Labor Markets

This conference will present both quantitative and qualitative research on questions related to low wage labor markets.  A wide variety of topics will be covered including: wage trends and shifts in occupations, policies that enhance wages (such as the minimum wage and the earned income tax credit), issues related to immigration and mobility among low-skilled workers, and issues related to stigma and identity among low-skilled workers.

Download the agenda

Download a map to the conference venue

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

The Effect of the District of Columbia Supplemental EITC on Poverty, Employment, and Income Growth
Bradley Hardy, American University

Bradley Hardy is an Assistant Professor of Public Administration and Policy at American University. His research interests lie within labor economics, with an emphasis on economic instability, intergenerational mobility, poverty policy, and socio-economic outcomes.

Event Andrews Conference Room, 2203 SS&H

For-Profit Colleges, Community Colleges, and Associates Degree Receipt
David Harding, UC Berkeley

David Harding is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Harding studies poverty and inequality, urban neighbborhoods, education, incarceration, and prisoner reentry. He uses both qualitative and quantitative methods.

Event Memorial Union II, UC Davis

New Results on Head Start’s Impact
Faculty Affiliate Doug Miller Gives His Institute for Social Sciences Noon Lecture

In this Institute for Social Sciences Noon Lecture, Doug Miller will discuss his ongoing research on Head Start and evaluate his recent findings. This Lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for Poverty Research.

Doug Miller is an Associate Professor of Economics at UC Davis. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University in 2000. He is a research affiliate of the Center for Poverty Research, and serves as a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research. 

Event Learn about the conference presenters College Access and Success for Low Income Students Memorial Union, MU II Room

Increasing College Access and Success for Low Income Students

This interdisciplinary conference will present new research in the area of college access and persistence, including findings from recent randomized control trials of targeted interventions for low income students.  The conference will also provide an opportunity for participants to discuss a variety of technical and methodological challenges in implementing interventions across a diverse set of educational settings, as well as in scaling up interventions.


 

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